Dissection of jasmonate functions in tomato stamen development by transcriptome and metabolome analyses

Abstract

Jasmonates are well known plant signaling components required for stress responses and development. A prominent feature of jasmonate biosynthesis or signaling mutants is the loss of fertility. In contrast to the male sterile phenotype of Arabidopsis mutants, the tomato mutant jai1-1 exhibits female sterility with additional severe effects on stamen and pollen development. Its senescence phenotype suggests a function of jasmonates in regulation of processes known to be mediated by ethylene. To test the hypothesis that ethylene involved in tomato stamen development is regulated by jasmonates, a temporal profiling of hormone content, transcriptome and metabolome of tomato stamens was performed using wild type and jai1-1. Wild type stamens showed a transient increase of jasmonates that is absent in jai1-1. Comparative transcriptome analyses revealed a diminished expression of genes involved in pollen nutrition at early developmental stages of jai1-1 stamens, but an enhanced expression of ethylene-related genes at late developmental stages. This finding coincides with an early increase of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) in jai1-1 and a premature pollen release from stamens, a phenotype similarly visible in an ethylene overproducing mutant. Application of jasmonates to flowers of transgenic plants affected in jasmonate biosynthesis diminished expression of ethylene-related genes, whereas the double mutant jai1-1 NeverRipe (ethylene insensitive) showed a complementation of jai1-1 phenotype in terms of dehiscence and pollen release. Our data suggest an essential role of jasmonates in the temporal inhibition of ethylene production to prevent premature desiccation of stamens and to ensure proper timing in flower development.

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